INFRASTRUCTURE — OCEAN ECONOMY : Le projet de pétrolier d’Albion dans la catégorie « High Risks »

Ce projet, nécessitant des investissements de Rs 6 milliards avec une capacité de 3,23 millions de tonnes de produits pétroliers annuellement, commenté dans le rapport « The Ocean Economy in Mauritius : Making it happen, making it last »
  • Consultations entre le gouvernement et la Banque mondiale cette semaine en vue de dégager un plan d’action pour ce nouveau pilier de l’économie avec des investissements de Rs 20 milliards sur 18 à 20 ans

Le projet visant à faire de l’Ocean Economy un des nouveaux piliers de développement fera l’objet ce jeudi de consultations à haut niveau entre le gouvernement et des consultants de la Banque mondiale, menés par Cervigni, Lead Environmental Economist. Le rapport, intitulé “The Ocean Economy in Mauritius : Making it happen, making it last”, avec des investissements de Rs 20 milliards par an et prévoyant la réalisation du projet sur une période de 18 à 20 ans, devra être avalisé en prévision d’une conférence nationale annoncée pour septembre.

Le projet visant à faire de l’Ocean Economy un des nouveaux piliers de développement fera l’objet ce jeudi de consultations à haut niveau entre le gouvernement et des consultants de la Banque mondiale, menés par Cervigni, Lead Environmental Economist. Le rapport, intitulé “The Ocean Economy in Mauritius : Making it happen, making it last”, avec des investissements de Rs 20 milliards par an et prévoyant la réalisation du projet sur une période de 18 à 20 ans, devra être avalisé en prévision d’une conférence nationale annoncée pour septembre.

Définissant l'O2 Strategy et procédant à un Assessment de l’« overall potential of the Ocean Economy to contribute to Mauritius’ development », la Banque mondiale se dit convaincue que « doubling the ocean economy is possible and worthwhile ». Toutefois, cela n’empêche pas les experts de la Banque mondiale d’émettre des réserves au sujet de certains projets d’envergure susceptibles de donner un nouvel élan à l’économie océanique. L’un des projets classés dans la catégorie des “high risks” n’est nul autre que le port pétrolier d’Albion, avec des tankers de 150 000 tonnes mouillant à quai.
Au chapitre 6 du volumineux rapport sur l’Ocean Economy, consacré à l’infrastructure portuaire, la Banque mondiale note en termes de “key messages” : « There are several large projects under discussion at the moment – including a new breakwater and Island Container Terminal near Fort George, and a petroleum products complex at Albion – that could transform the role of the port and substantially increase its earnings from non-domestic trade. However, these are high-risk projects that need to be carefully evaluated before deciding to go ahead. Container and oil transshipment are internationally mobile, and will be looking for attractive investment packages as well as suitable port facilities. » Outre le port pétrolier d’Albion, l’Inland Container Terminal, présenté comme « a large and complexe project », fait l’objet de réserves dans ce document en discussion.
Les premiers détails du port pétrolier d’Albion sont déclinés dans ce rapport, qui comprend des informations complémentaires sous la forme d’un “Technical Appendix”. Les investissements sont évalués à quelque Rs 6 milliards (USD 171 millions), assurés à partir d’un “grant” de l’Inde et ayant comme partenaires la Mangalore Refinery and Petrochemicals Ltd et l'Indian Oil Company. La première phase du projet, avec des injections de USD 160 millions, prévoit la mise en place de l’infrastructure pour un “maximum throughput” de 3,23 millions de tonnes de produits pétroliers annuellement et, la seconde phase, un complément d’investissements de USD 101 millions pour porter la capacité à 9,56 millions de tonnes par an. Le début de la construction est prévu pour cette année et la mise en opération annoncée pour 2020.
À ce chapitre, la Banque mondiale articule ses réserves par rapport à l’évolution de la demande de produits pétroliers dans cette partie du monde. Commentant les spécificités techniques du projet de port pétrolier à Albion, les consultants de cette institution internationale notent : « These are very large throughputs compared with Mauritius’ 2016 oil traffic : 1.42m tons of imports, of which 0.44 million tons were re-exported. They also represent relatively large shares of the target markets for petroleum products, which stretch from Djibouti to South Africa (10-15 percent in Phase 1, rising to 25 percent in Phase 2). »
La Banque mondiale ajoute : « No information is currently available about the expected revenues and operating costs of the transshipment operation, although we understand from MPA that the proposal submitted by the project sponsors expected it to have an NPV of USD 63.3 million over a 15-year period at a 10 percent discount rate. This information, combined with assumed future prices for petroleum products based on a crude oil price of USD 70 per barrel, has allowed us to “back-estimate” the likely cash flow as an input to the CGE model. »
À ce stade, devant l’absence d’indications précises sur la réalisation des projets envisagés, le rapport souligne : « Their capital costs, revenues, and operating costs will inevitably change as more information becomes available and the projects are adapted to meet the needs of particular private sector sponsors. The timing of individual projects in relation to the growth in demand, and the amounts of additional cargo that the project sponsors are able to bring with them, will also have an effect on the commercial viability and wider economic impacts of individual projects. This is because there are large indivisibilities in port investments (such as the island breakwater/container berth and the Albion oil jetty) whose capacity may take some years to fill up. »
Toujours au chapitre des « cautions », la Banque mondiale ne se prive pas d’attirer l’attention sur le fait que : « Finally, there is the issue of risk. The Ocean Economy is moving toward a new phase in which Mauritius will be competing on the global stage for port projects that could equally well be located in other countries. It will also, because of government budgetary constraints, become increasingly dependent on private finance. Risk allocation is therefore likely to become increasingly important in the structuring of new projects, while uncertainty about their timing will require more a flexible approach to port planning. »
D’un point de vue général, ce rapport de la Banque mondiale, qui fera l’objet de discussion jeudi, affirme : « Based on a macro-economic model of the country, developed in partnership with the Government of Mauritius, the report finds that doubling the GDP share of the OE (the “O2” strategy) is possible ; but achieving such a target is likely to take to at least 15-18 years. Attempts to pursue the O2 target over a shorter period of time may well result in undesirable economic outcomes, such as diseconomies of scale, price increases, excessive use of natural resources, and fiscal imbalances. » Il confrme : « O2 strategy can yield considerable growth results, including a 62 percent increase of the OE GDP in absolute terms, and of 38 percent in terms of its share in the national total (from 12.6 percent to 17.5 percent). Such an extra investment push would be large, being equivalent, on average, to an additional 1.6 percent of GDP going every year towards investment, compared to the last ten years’ average of investment as a share of GDP. While large, such extra effort increase would not be unconceivable, as it would to lift total investment back towards its previous average, and beyond. Full achievement of the O2 target in the longer term is estimated to require investments of around USD 8.2 billion. »


Les priorités à court terme
a réalisation du projet de Port Economy comme un des piliers de l’économie, devia se concréter sur une période de 15 à 18 ans. ais dans l’mmédiat, la Banqiue Mondiale a élaboré une feuille de roite comme suit :
● Prepare a draft National Ocean Policy Paper, including an action plan with short and medium term targets
● Prepare a draft unified regulatory framework for the Ocean Economy
● Develop a comprehensive training action plan to develop technical capacity in selected priority Ocean Economy areas
● Develop a governance and legal framework for the next steps of the Marine Spatial Planning process
● Develop a financial protection strategy against climate disasters, based on a diagnostic of economic and fiscal impact of disaster shocks
● Formulate a high level policy commitment on lagoon rehabilitation
● Develop a 3-years business plan for Bank fishery development
● Establish an integrated energy planning process through and inter-sector coordination panel
● Develop a more ambitious cable program looking eastwards (towards Asia) and northwards (to Europe and the Gulf)
● Strengthen the commercial functions of the Mauritius Port Authority through suitable capacity building