NELSON MANDELA CENTRE FOR AFRICAN CULTURE TRUST FUND : ZOURNE LANG EK KILTIR KREOL 2014

The Maroon Register for Moka District showing Coralie and Anna, two female slaves of Malagasy origin, who escaped from their owners in February 1825 (MNA/IA 40, Registre des Marronnages de Moka (1826-1833)

In the context of the International Kreol Language and Culture Day 2014, we are pleased to publish both online and in print Fam Maron, Fam Kouraz. (Maroon Women, Women of Courage). It is essential that we give voice to those who have been silenced by the dominant culture. Amongst those who have been silenced and made invisible in the archives of memory are women.  This publication pays tribute to women’s struggle in history and especially women maroon slaves. They are a source of inspiration for African women today and to the people of African descent in Mauritius and all over the world. It is for this reason that this publication is set against the background of the United Nations African Women Decade (2010-2020) and the People of African Descent Decade (2011-2021).
In the context of the International Kreol Language and Culture Day 2014, we are pleased to publish both online and in print Fam Maron, Fam Kouraz. (Maroon Women, Women of Courage). It is essential that we give voice to those who have been silenced by the dominant culture. Amongst those who have been silenced and made invisible in the archives of memory are women.  This publication pays tribute to women’s struggle in history and especially women maroon slaves. They are a source of inspiration for African women today and to the people of African descent in Mauritius and all over the world. It is for this reason that this publication is set against the background of the United Nations African Women Decade (2010-2020) and the People of African Descent Decade (2011-2021).

Fam Maron, Fam kouraz represents also our wish to democratise access to archives. It is for this reason that our publication is in Mauritian Kreol. For a country to make progress, it is important that its people know its history. Unfortunately our primary school kids still learn bits of their history in a foreign language. The result is that few Mauritians know and understand the past. Just as Nelson Mandela said in his autobiography: ‘Without language, one cannot talk to people and understand them; one cannot share their hopes and aspirations, grasp their history, appreciate their poetry, or savor their songs. ( The long walk to freedom).
In this publication, Stéphan Karghoo, Head of Documentation and Research at the Nelson Mandela Centre for African Culture, makes us discover historical documents from our national archives. On basis of these documents, he puts in a simple language the narratives of the maroons and especially the key role played by women. This publication is also meant for training in agency and social transformation. We have included a guide which can be used for reflection in action.

Website:  http://mandelacentre.gov.mu