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Prof Tanehisa Otabe, professor at Tokyo University’s Institute of Aesthetics explained that “wabi-sabi leaves something unfinished or incomplete for the play of imagination”. This opportunity to actively engage with something considered to be wabi-sabi achieves three things: an awareness of the natural forces involved in the creation of the piece; an acceptance of the power of nature; and an abandonment of dualism – the belief that we are separate from our surroundings. Combined, these experiences allow the viewer to see themselves as part of the natural world, no longer separated by societal constructs and instead at the mercy of natural timelines.

http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20181021-japans-unusual-way-to-view-the-world

(Credit: Nathaniel Noir/Alamy)